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that i have wasted in prison. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released from the prison. >> there is mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: released at the age of 72, remained vigilant that his country and freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today the majority of south africa, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1994 south african's castheir ballot in the first democratic election. >> this morning applause for the first black voter in history. >> reporter: mandela became the country's president, the first elected by all its people. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight, but now this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years, nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the worl
africa. >> we are one country. we are one people. >> one excludes the religious leaders, mr. mandela is the greatest person to have walked the face of the earth in human history. >> reporter: an icon not only for his fellow countrymen -- >> viva mandela! viva! >> reporter: -- but for the entire world. "nelson mandela." >> ladies and gentlemen. >> this is "headliners "headliners & legends" with lester holt. >> he is lauded the world over as a man of peace, a champion for the downtrodden. he suffered at the hands of racism and endured decades in prison only to emerge with his dignity intact, his spirit unbroken freedom fighter, ex-prisoner, nation builder. nelson mandela's legacy serves as a shining example not only for the people of the world today but for generations to come. >> reporter: nelson mandela's life begins far away from the turmoil, struggles and ultimate triumphs that will define his life. here in the transsky province of south africa, 550 miles south of johannesburg, mandela is born on july 18th, 1918. the name he is given will prove in a sense prophetic. >> nelson mande
courage changed the world. mr. mandela went from freedom fighter to political prisoner to president. >> his message of reconciliat n reconciliation, not vengeance, inspired people everywhere after he negotiated a peaceful end to the brutal segregation of black south africans and forgiveness for what the white government had done, oppressed them and imprisoned him. today, the world is remembering ali con. >> nelson mandela. nelson mandela. ♪ >> in south africa, the grieving and mourning are mixed with songs and celebration. for the man affectionately known by his clan name madibmadiba. remembering the life and legacy of any son mandela. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company. it is interesting how much of a celebration it has been. there is the mourning. there were tears tonight. today it's been singing and dancing, people celebrating the life. >> he seems to have an impact on just about everyone. people around the world are reacting. we are watching live pictures of him being celebrated in the streets of johannesburg. died in the suburbs of johannesb
square. mr. mandela's host on that day was the mayor of bedford, councillor carole ellis. sadly, councillor ellis is seriously ill at present, but i know that she is so proud of her own and of bedford's part in mr. mandela's story. between 1986 and 1990, the right honorable gentleman member for bermondsey and old southwark , i and peter pike, the former member for burnley, made three visits to south africa at the invitation of the followers of christ working for a peaceful resolution of the situation there. on our return from our first visit, on june 17, we made joint speeches in a debate here in the house of commons, referring to each other as our honorable friends -- a point duly noted by hansard. we had gone together -- safety in numbers -- at a time when the anc was still banned, the political situation was deteriorating, violence was abroad, and where the isolation of south africa was impacting on the flow of anything but very polarised information. we were able to report back to our respective party leaders on what we found. i had half an hour with an anxious, worried, an
that lined auburn aven. that was a very sad occasion. when mr. mandela came to atlanta it was a happy joyous occasion for people of atlanta and really certainly for people of our nation and around the world. >> how do you cope while everyone else is mourning? >> i think what we are sad about is the loss at the same token the confr contribution to the ws so incredible. he is now in a better place as we see in the christian tradition. he has gone home to rest with god. he has paid far more duce t duer world community than the average individual would be able to. and for that we are so thankful for this dignified leadership of nelson mandela. >> talk about the similar traits you see between your father and nelson mandela. >> i would say if we talked about various traits of nelson mandela and martin luther king jr. they both unrelenting. >> my dad was unrelenting and mr. mandela was unrelenting for his fight for justice and there are par parallels in those particular areas my dad used his voice to represent the poor and oppressed. president mandela used his voice to represent the poor and oppres
are one of the most humble person i ever met. i will tell you whether mr. mandela arrived today he said to our producer and said what is the subject of today's show? [ applause ] and she said nelson mandela. you are the subject of today's show. and he goes, oh, all right. >> she credits mandela as the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the judge ruled he could stay ignoring a deportationing order two decades ago. >>> libyan government says so far no one claimed responsibility for shooting an american teacher to death as he jogged through the
klerk made a historic announcement. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> teichner: a moment forever seared into our memory. after more than a quarter century behind bars, nelson mandela stepped into the light. >> amandla! >> teichner: mandela at 71 emerged looking not like a broken prisoner, but like a king. >> he had won. but mandela is famous for his smile, but that smile is not there. and i believe he was deeply aware of the enormous challenge and responsibility that now lay on him. ♪ >> we will reach the goal of liberating the black people of this country within our lifetime. >> teichner: nelson mandela was free, but the fight for freedom was far from over. >> pelley: when we come back, "60 minutes'" bob simon reflects on mandela's journey from prisoner to president. honestly, i'm not looking for five-star treatment. i get times are tight. but it's hard to get any work done like this. then came this baby -- small but with windows and office. it runs my work stuff. ...and i can use apps like flipboard for news, or xbox video to wat
. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged behind bars without bitterness to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> nelson mandela set aside his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: as south africa's first black president mandela remained a humble man, taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. as promised he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> be south africa has been a despottic state throughout almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela is one of the best and optimistic qualities that he has to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man who has done his duty on earth. >> here with us now, a giant of civil rights. you got a chance to interview president mandela in february of 1990 after he came out of prison after 27 years. how did you finds him? how
but not forgotten. ♪ free free nelson mandela >> mr. nelson mandela will be released. >> good evening. this is nelson mandela's first full day of freedom. >> reporter: released at the age of 72 in 1990. he remained ever vigilant that his country and its freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you, not as a prophet. but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release after nearly 30 years of imprisonment ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today, the majority of south africans, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1993, mandela, along with south africa's president, f.w. de klerk, won the nobel peace prize. and in 1994, mandela's dream was realized when black south africans cast their first ballots in a democratic election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> afri
government, under increasing pressure and isolated in the world, suddenly yielded. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released at the staff prison. >> reporter: it was an amazing moment when mandela walked out of prison. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half
main soccer stadium. mr. mandela's remains will be on view to the public in pretoria beginning wednesday before being moved to the village of kun, where he grew up, where next sunday nelson mandela will be laid to rest. as for this sunday, countless americans here at home are reflecting on nell san mandela's legacy. wand that in mind we turn to bob schieffer in washington for look what's ahead on "face the nation." >> schieffer: good morning, charles. we're going to talk to the poet mya angelo about the epic poem she has written to mark the passing of nelson mandela. >> osgood: we'll be watching. next week, here on "sunday morning." >> never so alive -- thank you. >> osgood: the real tale of charles dickens. >> you get the sense of furious energy in a way. man who can't stop. >> osgood: with actor ray finnes. anything we purchase c we leave you this sunday back in south africa at cougar national park. i'm charles osgood. please join us again next "sunday morning" until then i'll see you on the radio. know the feeling? copd includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. spiriva is
to announce that mr. nelson mandela will be released on sunday the 11th of february at about 3:00 p.m. >> so it was. february 11th, 1990, nelson mandela walked free. his wife at his side. ♪ black south africa erupted in orgy of celebration. >> we begin in south africa where it is welcome home day for nelson mandela. >> good morning, charlie. nelson mandela has been in johannesburg for about 18 hours but his real homecoming when he arrived in soweta in a town he hasn't seen nor 27 years. >> looking back, amazing scenes. the astonishing pictures, four years later in 1994 when fights stood with blacks in line to vote in south africa's first nonracial election, to elect nelson mandela, president. >> he wins them over. he seduces them. >> the book "playing the enemy" was turned in to the movie. there is no better example of how he seduced all races than the day south africa beat new zealand in the 1995 rugby world cup final. >> goal. >> rugby had been the white man's sport. the green jersey a symbol of apartheid for blacks. but here was south africa's first black president being cheered as he w
gift would come a year later, his release. >> there is mr. nelson mandela, a free man. >> reporter: we recall that promise he made to his children more than two decades earlier. i am certain that one day i will be back home to live in happiness until the end of my days. >> one day back at home until the end of my days, the cherished letters of a father, a husband and a leader and writing at the bottom of every letter, 466, prisoner 466 in the year 1964. >> thank you, david. thinking of those prison years as we know he used everything in his power to keep his dignity, used his charm to win over enemies. he used his charm to win over enemies. we've seen him love to dance, take pride in dressing well. his fellow inmates like to say he refused to be a victim and he taught them the same, taking up gardening inside prison saying it's a metaphor for life, teaching you to nourish life and weed out that which cannot succeed. as we have been saying famously, he loved to laugh. >> when i told one of my friends a few months ago that i wanted to retire, he growled at me. coach, you are retired. if
to former south african president nelson mandela. he passed away last thursday at the age of 95. mr. mandela serve as south africa's first black president from 1994 to 1999. he spent 27 youth in prison before he was elected president. >> the house will wish to know how we intend to proceed today. defense questions will be postponed to next monday. the present list of questions will be carried over. there will not be another shuffle to the table office will announce consequential changes shortly. this is a special day for special tribute to a special statesmen, nelson mandela. i hope that as many members as possible will be able to contribute. tributes may continue until 10 p.m. there will be no end of day adjournment debate. the house will also wish to know that there will be an event to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of nelson mandela, taking place in westminster hall at 2 p.m. on thursday december 12. i call the prime minister. >> thank you, mr. speaker. nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime, a pivotal figure in the history of south africa and the world,
through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> reporter: after 27 years in prison nelson mandela walked into freedom, against all odds the leader of rebellion against south africa's white apartheid government became the leader of national unity. mandela's decades long rebellion transformed him from a convicted trader into a freedom fighter and international hero. >> i have fought very firmly against apartheid on the nation. >> reporter: mandela was born into approved family. he support -- into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence to bring about change. he became a lawyer and opened the first south african law firm to defend blacks who were forced from their land, but in 1960 mandela turned militant when 69 black protesters were massacred. >> many use fear, but it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence. >> reporter: mandela lived up to his tribal name troublemaker repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison on south africa's infamous robin island. he wa
on "jansing and co." back in june about nelson mandela's legacy. in a statement following his death, mrs. evers said, quote, we are all students of mandela for he taught us about faith, perseverance, and devotion to one's ideals. morgan freeman, sydney patiya both portrayed him in films. the long walk to freedom chronicles his life from childhood through his inauguration. it also looks at his relationship with his wife winnie played by naomi harris. and the film's director justin chadwick talked to me about the film. >> we all know mandela the great political leader, the activist, but we don't know him as a young man. as a man who loved cars, tailoring, who is the most amazing lawyer in his early days in the first black lawyer in johannesburg. so we want to explore a mandela that hadn't been seen before that people don't know, that's not in the history books. >> last night prince william and his wife kate attend the uk premiere for that film in london. they along with the rest of the audience found out about his death while the credits were rolling. >> we're just reminded of what an extr
. >> was nelson mandela forceful in that record? >> very much so. he and mr sulu were great leaders. sosulo was a father-figure. they were a different type of figures. >> if sosulo was the father, what would nelson mandela be? >> the elder brother. >> the elder brother, in captivity, relevant but fine. challenging procedure. qualities that helped him become the president of south africa. how will his fellow prisoner remember him? >> i'd say courageous, selfless with tremendous political foresight. prepared to sacrifices everything for the cause of the people, all the oppressed people in this country. he had tremendous forsite not only because of south africa. a caring and compassionate person. he would put his personal confirms in the backburner, when he sees his fellow prisoner. there would be tensions, bankings -- bannings and all that. he never that that interfere with his responsibilities towards us. he went through everything. one characteristic of many that matured while he suffered the years of hardship on the island. they set out to break him. what happened was quite the reverse. on
yesterday. today, south africa's president released the first information on how mandela will be honored. after ten days of national mourning, a state funeral will be held. president and mrs. obama are among those scheduled to attend along with every living u.s. president and various other leaders from around the world. mandela will be buried december 15th in a private service in the village where he grew up. nbc bay area's joe rosato jr. shows us how mandela is being remembered by a few people here in the bay area who played a small role in mandela's effort to end apartheid. >> reporter: there are many pictures in the collection of reverend cecile williams but the one he counts as his most precious is the photo of him with nelson mandela. >> that picture you see of me speaking from after greeting him at that particular point is a picture that i cherish. >> reporter: the picture was taken during mandela's 1990 visit to the oakland coliseum four months after released from prison. williams was there to greet him. >> i was just so, so overcome by this man who was not just soft spoken, but w
or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> reporter: as a senator obama had visited mandela, and the president and mrs. obama brought their doubters to robben island prison so they could better understand what mandela had suffered. after he died, michelle obama tweeted we will forever draw strength and inspiration from nelson mandela's extraordinary example of moral courage, kindness and humility. bill clinton tweeted a picture and wrote, "i will never forget my friend madibaa," use the affectionate name by which mandela was known to his followers. mandela wasn't always on the u.s. side. in the 1980s president reagan supported apartheid regime, and eastern as protests broke out an college campuses across america demanding the u.s. punish the regime. ♪ ♪ free mandela >> reporter: "free nelson mandela" became a popular anthem for black and white americans. finally, congress, including key republicans, overrode reagan's veto imposing the economic sanctions that helped break the apartheid regime. that set the stage for mandela's triumphant visit to washington as his country'
stunning, saying thicks like go home, ted, you're drunk. he, mandela, was communist terrorist and targeted people for no other reason than being white. stunned to see you support this scumb scumbag, mr. cruz. he was a communist, a huge supporter of abortion. putting him in the same language of stalin, fdr, who are also dead and don't deserve a eulogy either. what does that tell us about the generations reflecting on this? >> shocking comments. these are ted cruz's ostensible supporters. how incredibly disturbing must it be for americans to read that, to say this is -- this vein of political thought, however large or small it is, exists in our country. >> i hope it's disturbing to us. >> i hope so. >> i'm mostly disturbed that maybe it isn't disturbing to us. >> obviously americans who agree with it, they're out there. i can't imagine it's a very large population, but it saez lot about people have asked for a long time what's the racial perspective of tea party members. unfortunately this is the perspective of some of them. >> remember, where you started the conversation about dr. king, i w
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)